Harvard Business School launches race, gender and equity initiative – News


BOSTON—Harvard Business School (HBS) today announced the creation of the Race, Gender and Equity Initiative, which is both a rebranding of the Gender Initiative and a reflection of the work what she has done and will do to understand and advance equality, including racial equality, in organizations and businesses. The role of the Initiative, much like the Gender Initiative before it, will be to catalyze and translate cutting-edge research to transform practice, empower leaders to drive change, and eradicate gender, race, and other forms inequality in business and society.

“It’s a particularly good time for this transition,” noted Dean Srikant Datar. “Two years ago, the School announced its Action Plan for Advancing Racial Equity, which called for the formation of this initiative as well as the launch of an Office for Diversity, Equity and inclusion led by our first Director of Diversity and Inclusion These two new entities will be important pillars, driving work both within Harvard Business School and with alumni and other business leaders. business in a range of organizations and contexts.

Although the work of the Gender Initiative was never limited to gender alone, it was an anchor for the launch and early years of the Initiative. The Initiative was created during the 2014-2015 school year, following the School’s commemoration of 50 years of women at HBS. At the time, a number of professors were publishing important new research on gender and a lively conversation about gender inequality and research activities that could fuel advances in the field.

The new name better reflects the work undertaken by the Initiative, dating back to some of its earliest conferences as well as more recent events, projects and collaborations, comments director Colleen Ammerman.

“As an Initiative, we are ‘research-powered’, and research on race and other areas of inequality like social class and sexual orientation has grown since the Initiative was launched. . It makes sense that our name aligns with this current state,” Ammerman explained. “We hope this change will help us engage effectively with leaders and organizations working to advance diversity and equity.”

“We name race and gender as two important axes of inequality that the school is committed to addressing, but also want to be clear that other areas are and will continue to be supported by the school. school and its faculty,” noted Robin Ely, Diane Doerge Wilson Chair in Business Administration and chair of the Initiative’s faculty. “Our faculty pursues research in a wide range of equity-related fields, creating knowledge that helps leaders drive change in their organizations and in the world.”

This year, the Initiative will partner with the Institute for Business in Global Society (BiGS). The Institute provides a research-based platform to address critical business and societal issues, and the Race, Gender and Equity Initiative will work closely with this year’s cohort of BiGS Fellows, academic researchers who join the School to work on specific problem-related projects. of business and society. For the 2022-2023 academic year, the fellowship is dedicated to scholars whose work addresses issues of race, diversity, inclusion, and inequality, in line with the Initiative’s mission.

The Initiative will host the School’s work on the OneTen Initiative. As part of HBS’s ongoing efforts to advance racial equity and diversity, the school has signed on as the first academic partner of OneTen, a coalition of leading leaders and organizations committed to hiring one million black people over the next 10 years in jobs with family support. salaries and opportunities for advancement. The collaboration will bring together the resources of HBS with the growing OneTen network of U.S. companies committed to making a lasting systemic impact on racial and economic justice.

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