First Selectman Fred Camillo and Selectwoman Lauren Rabin win second term in Greenwich


GREENWICH – Fred Camillo, who successfully tackled the challenges of COVID-19 in his first term as first coach, was re-elected on Tuesday in a landslide for a second term in a Republican sweep in local elections.

Selectwoman Lauren Rabin was also re-elected to the Selectmen board of directors as the GOP made a strong display of the ticket as the results came in on Tuesday night.

Early results showed Camillo won 69% of the vote against his Democratic challenger, William Kelly.

“I think we are putting schools and infrastructure at the top of the agenda,” Kelly said in her concession speech as Democrats gathered at the Old Greenwich Social Club. “I hope the message resonates.”

Kelly said he was happy with his campaign and said, “I did what I could.”

School on election day in Greenwich, Connecticut on Tuesday, November 2, 2021. Outgoing Republican Fred Camillo faced off against the Democrat Bill Kelly in the race for the first Selectman. In addition, the positions of tax collector, municipal clerk and gendarme, as well as positions on the Estimation and Taxation Council, the Education Council, the Representative Municipal Assembly and the Appeals Council of evaluation were up for grabs.”/>

First Selectman candidate Bill Kelly campaigns outside the District 12 polling center at North Mianus School on election day in Greenwich, Connecticut on Tuesday, November 2, 2021. Outgoing Republican Fred Camillo faced off against the Democrat Bill Kelly in the race for the first Selectman. In addition, the positions of tax collector, municipal clerk and police officer, as well as positions on the Estimation and Taxation Council, the Education Council, the Representative Municipal Assembly and the Council of appraisal call were up for grabs.

Tyler Sizemore / Hearst Connecticut Media

The third seat on the board will be filled by Democratic nominee for the election, Janet Stone McGuigan, who won the third total of votes among the four candidates for the board.

Camillo and Rabin, who both grew up in Greenwich, campaigned on their close ties to the community.


Immediately after the polls closed, the town’s Republican Committee Chairman Dan Quigley was quick to project optimism as a loud and festive crowd gathered at the GOP headquarters. It was decorated with red, white and blue balloons and celebratory music was played.

“I was optimistic,” Quigley said of the election results. The Republicans had run a “very positive campaign” based on the issues, he said. All of the GOP candidates had “worked very hard” to deliver a message he said resonated with voters, who he said are tired of negative campaigns.

Quigley said Camillo and Rabin had done a great job during their two years in office, especially during the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, and had won the trust and “broad support” of voters. And Quigley also said they worked together as partners on Selectmen’s board, building on a friendship that started when the two were kids growing up in Greenwich.

“I think the fact that they grew up together and were friends when they were kids is such an amazing story,” Quigley said. “When they first told me this in 2019, I couldn’t believe it and told them they had to put it all over the campaign materials. … They both got to know so many people in the city who live here and get involved in the community that they have built so much goodwill here. They also play so well against each other. Fred is a guy who has a big picture and thinks boldly, and Lauren is very focused and looks at the details. I think they complement each other. They are very nice and we are very lucky to have them.

As polling closed, the Greenwich Voters’ Office registrar said the turnout was 40.32%, down almost 7 percentage points from 2019, when Camillo and Rabin were elected for the first time to the board of directors.

Democrats haven’t won the first selectman’s election since 2001, when Richard Bergstresser defeated incumbent Republican Lolly Prince. It was also the last time Democrats held a majority on the Board of Selectmen, along with Bergstresser and Penny Monahan.

Tale of the countryside

Fred Camillo, who served as the state representative for the 151st District at State House for 11 years until he was elected first selectman in 2019, is originally from the city. He was the first person in the city’s history to be elected as the first elected official, representative of the state and to the representative municipal assembly.

Much of his first term as the first selectman was dominated by issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite this, Camillo said during the campaign that he was still able to achieve many of his goals. He cited expanding alfresco dining to boost local restaurants, securing a $ 5 million private contribution to build a new civic center in East Greenwich and continuing improvement projects. and beautification of the city.

Additionally, Camillo received high marks from many, including Democrats, for his handling of the pandemic crisis. He worked closely with Governor Ned Lamont as well as state and local health officials to put in place temporary mask warrants and other regulations.

Camillo ran against Kelly, a Democrat who was previously a member of the RTM, the Board of Education, and the Board of Estimate and Taxation.

Joe Gross, left, and Gerri Flemming, right, chat with Democratic candidate for Greenwich's first selectman William Kelly during a campaign march on Saturday, October 16, 2021.

Joe Gross, left, and Gerri Flemming, right, chat with Democratic candidate for Greenwich’s first selectman William Kelly during a campaign march on Saturday, October 16, 2021.

File / Carol Kaliff / For Hearst Connecticut Media

In her first candidacy for Greenwich’s top elected office this year, Kelly led a heated campaign criticizing Camillo for relying on public-private partnerships to deliver investment projects and targeting BET led by Republicans for failing to adequately fund Greenwich Public Schools.

Kelly said school expenses were a personal issue for him as his granddaughter attends North Mianus School, where a ceiling has collapsed in a classroom, causing widespread flooding and damage. It could have been worse if the students had been in class when this happened, he said. Kelly had also said on several occasions that he would seek to prioritize repairs at Central Middle School, where structural issues have been reported.

In the Board of Selectmen race, Rabin, a Republican seeking her second term, faced a challenge from Stone McGuigan, a Democrat.

The Greenwich Republican City Committee unanimously backed selected woman Lauren Rabin for another term in a meeting on July 27, 2021

The Greenwich Republican City Committee unanimously backed selected woman Lauren Rabin for another term in a meeting on July 27, 2021

File / Ken Borsuk / Hearst Media Connecticut /

Rabin has been active on the board for the past two years, chairing the Re-Imagine Greenwich committee, which has prioritized the promotion and improvement of the city center as well as the promotion of an active campaign on social networks. She said she has also been active in helping the problems of the elderly and in creating more affordable housing in Greenwich.

Selectman Democratic candidate Janet Stone McGuigan campaigns outside the North Mianus School District 12 polling center on election day in Greenwich, Connecticut on Tuesday, November 2, 2021. Outgoing Republican Fred Camillo faced off against Democrat Bill Kelly in the race for the first Selectman.  In addition, the positions of tax collector, municipal clerk and gendarme, as well as positions on the Estimation and Taxation Council, the Education Council, the Representative Municipal Assembly and the Council of Appeal of evaluation were up for grabs.

Selectman Democratic candidate Janet Stone McGuigan campaigns outside the North Mianus School District 12 polling center on election day in Greenwich, Connecticut on Tuesday, November 2, 2021. Outgoing Republican Fred Camillo faced off against Democrat Bill Kelly in the race for the first Selectman. In addition, the positions of tax collector, municipal clerk and police officer, as well as positions on the Estimation and Taxation Council, the Education Council, the Representative Municipal Assembly and the Council of appraisal call were up for grabs.

Tyler Sizemore / Hearst Connecticut Media

Stone McGuigan, who was a member of the Greenwich RTM, was also a member of the PTA City Council and the League of Women Voters of Greenwich. She had previously worked as a mediator in Washington, DC, and in environmental policy development.


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