Candidates for Superintendent of Education Debate


Candidates for South Carolina’s superintendent of education took part in the debate Wednesday night at Columbia. Republican candidate Ellen Weaver and Democratic candidate Lisa Ellis faced off in an attempt to win your vote. Watch the opening statements above. The debate aired on SCETV at 7 p.m. Ellis hoped her 22 years of experience as a teacher in the state as the voice of the teacher at the state level. While Weaver said his connections in the legislature and his management experience will keep the needle moving. Either way, the two think it’s all about the South Carolina students. Topics on school expenses, learning loss, and teacher compensation were some of the many discussed. Ellis, a longtime teacher, said during Wednesday’s debate that South Carolina schools are underfunded and have been for some time. I haven’t done this since 2008 and we see the price our students are paying because of it,” Ellis said. the money is there, but it is not being spent appropriately. “I will start by getting my own house in order at the state department of education, a top-down audit to understand how the money is currently being spent, where we can find savings, so that we can return that money to the classroom to support our students and teachers,” Weaver said. Both agreed on the need to improve early literacy to help address learning loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “They learn to read from kindergarten through 2nd grade and in 3rd grade they read to learn. If we can get them to read in those early years, we nurture them throughout their K-12 careers. But nothing else will work until you have high-quality teachers, let them do their jobs, and reduce class sizes,” Ellis said. “We need to get back to teaching the proven science of reading and we too that in-class tutoring is also very helpful. So we need an army of mentors and tutors in our schools to support our teachers,” Weaver said. When it comes to teacher compensation, Ellis said South Carolina needs to look beyond this. what other states are paying and also other industries.” We’re competing with all the jobs there and so if you want to make it competitive. You have to look outside of education and see it that way,” Ellis said. Weaver, on the other hand, thinks there are ways to raise salaries within the current state budget. and the United States “We want to prepare them for the world that will exist which is a beautifully diverse world. We need to make sure we give all perspectives so they can make their own decisions about what they believe and follow them to a safe space where the schools are,” Ellis said. “A parent, if he wants his child to read these materials can always go out and buy them on amazon. We’re not talking about killing a mockingbird, or a catcher in the rye or some of those classics that we know are literary masterpieces that our students need to be exposed to. We are talking about grossly inappropriate pornographic material that has unfortunately been found in South Carolina school libraries,” Weaver said. Both contestants also touched on school choice, and you can hear their thoughts on that and other topics discussed Wednesday below.

Candidates for South Carolina’s superintendent of education took part in the debate Wednesday night at Columbia.

Republican candidate Ellen Weaver and Democratic candidate Lisa Ellis squared off to try to win your vote.

Watch the opening statements above.

The debate broadcast on SCETV at 7 p.m.

Ellis hoped that her 22 years of experience as a teacher in the state would bring that voice of a teacher to the state level.

While Weaver said his connections in the legislature and his management experience will keep the needle moving.

Either way, the two think it’s all about the South Carolina students.

Topics on school expenses, learning loss and teacher compensation were some of the many topics covered.

Ellis, a longtime teacher, said during Wednesday’s debate that South Carolina schools are underfunded and have been for some time.

“I think we have a responsibility, the legislature has a responsibility to fund education and they haven’t since 2008 and we see the price our students are paying because of that,” Ellis said.

While Weaver, who is endorsed by current superintendent Molly Spearman, disagrees, saying the money is there but not being spent appropriately.

“I will start by getting my own house in order at the state department of education, a top-down audit to understand how the money is currently being spent, where we can find savings, so that we can return that money to the classroom to support our students and teachers,” Weaver said.

Both agreed on the need to improve early literacy to help address learning loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“They learn to read in K-2 and in 3-grade they read to learn. If we can get them to read in those early years, we raise them through their K-12 careers. But nothing else is going to work until you have high-quality teachers there and let them do their job and reduce those class sizes,” Ellis said.

“We need to start teaching the proven science of reading again and we also know that in-class tutoring is also very useful, so we need an army of mentors and tutors in our schools to support our teachers,” said Weaver.

When it comes to teacher compensation, Ellis said South Carolina needs to look beyond what other states pay and also other industries.

“We’re competing with every job and so if you want to make it competitive. You have to look outside of education and look at it that way,” Ellis said.

Weaver, on the other hand, thinks there are ways to increase wages within the current budget

Each also brought up the idea of ​​the book ban that was seen in counties across the state and across the United States.

“We want to prepare them for the world that will exist which is a beautifully diverse world. We need to make sure that we give all perspectives so that they can make their own decisions about what they believe and follow them into a safe space. where the schools are,” Ellis said.

“A parent, if they want their child to read these materials, can always go out and buy them on Amazon. We’re not talking about killing a mockingbird, or a catcher in the rye or some of these classics that we know are literary masterpieces that our students need to be exposed to. We’re talking about grossly inappropriate pornographic material that has unfortunately been found in South Carolina school libraries,” Weaver said.

Both contestants also touched on school choice, and you can hear their thoughts on that and other topics discussed Wednesday below.

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