Beverly Hills cop accused of playing music to avoid being broadcast live on Instagram


A Beverly Hills cop has been accused of using music copyright laws to try to stop an activist from live streaming his interaction on Instagram.

Sennett Devermont claims in social media posts that he went to a Beverly Hills police department on Friday to ask a question about Freedom of Information Act application forms.

Still, he alleges that Sgt. Billy Fair started playing music while Devermont filmed the conversation in order to activate copyright filters and cut or remove the video.

The video shows Fair pulled out her phone to play Sublime’s “Santeria” after asking Devermont if it was necessary to broadcast live to her 300,000 subscribers.

Fair acted after Devermont showed the name and phone number of another officer he had just handed over to her.

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In one video, Devermont says dating from later in the day, Fair uses the same tactic, pictured

Activist Sennett Devermont accused the Beverly Hills sergeant. Billy Fair for using music copyright laws to try to stop activist from live streaming his interaction on Instagram

Devermont shares videos of all of his interactions with police officers online and has expressed concern that his right to free speech is being violated by cops playing music when they see his livestream.

Civilians are legally permitted to openly film police officers on duty under the First Amendment under most circumstances.

“It is a form of attack on freedom of expression. He plays copyrighted music, ”Devermont told CBS Los Angeles.

“To me, it’s not anti-cop. It’s anti-bad cop, ” he added from his own stream.

Instagram has a hacking rule that prevents a lot of music from playing in videos posted on the platform for copyright reasons.

This means that any video with music can be deleted by Instagram even if it is only playing in the background.

Pictured is Sergeant Billy Fair

Pictured is Sergeant Billy Fair

It also means that even if Instagram didn’t immediately select a song in a video, anyone, including a police officer, could report it for copyright infringement if it were saved to an account afterwards.

Devermont said he was only at the station to get body camera footage of an incident in which he received a ticket he felt was unfair, and to ask if multiple forms were needed for different incidents with the same agent.

According to the videos, until Fair realized that Devermont was broadcasting and showing the contact details of another officer to his followers, the conversation between the two remained friendly.

Yet once the activist refuses to give in and stop the stream, Fair begins to look at her phone to start the music and remains silent for more than a minute until much of a song. be played.

In videos posted to his account named Mr. Checkpoint, Devermont is then seen being told by Fairs that he cannot hear him, as the officer continues to play music on his phone.

At another point, the officer asks if the two can talk without the phone recording him.

Devermont shared several videos from Fair to Instagram in which he appeared to be using the tactic

Devermont shared several videos from Fair to Instagram in which he appeared to be using the tactic

In a second video, which the activist said was filmed later in the afternoon, Devermont approaches Fair as he is reportedly responding to a burglary.

Again, the officer is seen playing music on his phone and telling Devermont he can’t hear her.

Devermont responds by saying that Fair should have her body camera turned on because this is an active crime scene.

‘I have read the comments [on your account], they say how fake you are, Fair retorts.

According to Vice, this is not the only instance where Devermont’s streams have been targeted by an officer playing music.

Devermont accused Beverly Hills cops of threatening his right to free speech

Devermont accused Beverly Hills cops of threatening his right to free speech

The activist broadcasts all his interactions with the police on social networks

The activist broadcasts all his interactions with the police on social networks

They report that he shared with them another unpublished video on his public channels in which an officer already detonates The Beatles’ “In My Life” as Devermont approaches.

Instagram has not commented on the videos in question, but told Vice that “our restrictions take into account the following: how much of the total video has recorded music, the total number of songs in the video, and how long of each song. included in the video. ‘

Devermont’s videos – including a longer version containing the entire song – remained on the platform.

The Beverly Hills Police Department said it was investigating the incident.

The department told CBS it does not tolerate officers playing music on their phones while speaking to the public or taking reports.

“I’m grateful for any time a department is willing to look at its officers,” Devermont said, while adding he was “still skeptical.”

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